REUTERS | Kacper Pempel

Beverley Barton, one of the editors in the Practical Law Dispute Resolution team, was delighted to have the opportunity to catch up with Susan Acland-Hood, Chief Executive of Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service.

In Part One of a series of blogs, Susan talked about some of the challenges she faces in her role, and the skills that equip her for the task. Now, in Part Two, she discusses some of her impressions of the civil justice system, and the role it has to play in society as a whole. Continue reading

REUTERS | Paulo Whitaker

Often, a litigator’s single greatest desire is for clarity: of instructions, tactics, or argument. Few circumstances can disrupt this as effectively as a large group of clients or opponents, each clamouring for different (often mutually exclusive) approaches. Once such a case reaches a certain size, it is simply not feasible to proceed in the usual way, with all parties giving evidence and making submissions. There are a number of ways of addressing this problem, each with unique benefits and pitfalls. Continue reading

REUTERS | Toby Melville

Beverley Barton, one of the editors in the Practical Law Dispute Resolution team, was delighted to have the opportunity to catch up with Susan Acland-Hood, Chief Executive of Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service.

In Part One of a series of blogs, Susan talks about some of the challenges she faces in her role, and the skills that equip her for the task. In Part Two, she discusses some of her impressions of the civil justice system, and the role it has to play in society as a whole. In Part Three, she provides an update on the courts modernisation programme. Continue reading

REUTERS | Mukesh Gupta

I attended the final event in the Global Pound Conference (GPC) series in London last week, Shaping the future of dispute resolution and improving access to justice. This was a series of conferences which took place in 29 different global locations at which delegates were asked the same series of questions to obtain data to contribute to the debate on how current dispute resolution processes can evolve to better serve the needs of their users. The questions were aimed at finding out what parties want from commercial dispute resolution processes and how current systems can be improved, and identifying obstacles to change and how these can be overcome. Continue reading

REUTERS | Leonhard Foeger

Former Tory Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell MP’s foray into the hard fought privacy litigation known as “Plebgate” produced the most important costs case reported in 2013 (see Mitchell v News Group Newspapers). His libel action had turned on what he had (or had not) said to a police officer at the entrance to Downing Street when attempting to depart through the gates on his bicycle without dismounting. The case failed at trial before Mitting J, so the issue which had intrigued costs gurus became academic: had he won, Mr Mitchell’s budgeted costs would have been limited to applicable court fees, owing to his solicitor’s failure to serve a costs budget within the time limit set out in CPR 3.13. As he lost, that did not happen. Continue reading

REUTERS | Russell Cheyne

Did you know?

Every six months, at the beginning of the year and half way through the year, Practical Law Dispute Resolution puts together an article which aims to summarise all of the main developments that will affect civil litigation and ADR practitioners for the next few months. Last week we published the most recent of these documents, Practical Law Dispute Resolution: What to expect in the second half of 2017. Continue reading

REUTERS | Paulo Whitaker

Almost a year ago, on 1 August 2016, the Civil Justice Council (CJC) published its report on concurrent expert evidence, also known as “hot-tubbing“. The report was prompted in part by a perception that, despite the potential benefits of hot-tubbing, the procedure had not been widely used since it was formally introduced into English civil procedure as part of the Jackson reforms. The report made a number of recommendations aimed at enhancing familiarity with hot-tubbing amongst the judiciary and practitioners, and encouraging its use in appropriate cases. Continue reading